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Manchester United fan thrown off MUTV for wearing green-and-gold scarf

04 Mar 2010 02:12:51

Manchester United fan thrown off MUTV for wearing green-and-gold scarf

Manchester United have been accused of behaving like a communist dictatorship  after barring a fan wearing a green-and-gold scarf from appearing on the club' s in-house television station. Lifelong supporter Steve Tilzey was thrown off the show Red Cafe on MUTV when he refused to take off the scarf, a symbol of the protests against the Glazer  family's ownership. Making a stand: United fans wearing green and gold protest at the Glazer family He said: 'This is censorship. It's symbolic of what is happening at the club  and it is bang out of order. It's like being told to leave by the secret police or the Stasi. But this isn't Tianaman Square, it's a peaceful protest.' Former United players answer questions from supporters on the programme and Tilzey is often a member of the audience. He added: 'I have been going on it regularly for about 18 months. About 20  minutes into the programme during an advertising break, suddenly I got a tap on  my shoulder and there were two or three security guards saying: "You have to  take that off or leave." I said: "I will never take the scarf off but I am  prepared to leave."   'I don't blame the producer or the floor manager. They got a call and they were  told to get me off. Another man was wearing a green-and-gold scarf but he chose  to take his off. He must have felt intimidated. Grounds for concern: United fans stage a protest at Old Trafford 'I went to the bar and people, the crew, the security guards, were coming up to  me and saying: "That is so, so wrong". "I don't wear it to wind people up. I wear it because it's my club. I have been  wearing it for the last five or six weeks. I wore it at work and in town and I didn't even think about it when I went to the show with it on. I wore it on the Red Cafe about three weeks ago and no one said a thing. This is the first time  the club has gone into press censorship. It's not acceptable.'  And Tilzey said the club's heavy-handed treatment was needless - because he  wasn't using the show to ask awkward questions. He added: 'I had put my name down to ask a question. I wanted to ask Lee Martin, one of the ex-players, about the 1991 European campaign. It wasn't a political statement.'  Manchester United chief David Gill blasts Red Knights takeover bid and claims Sir Alex Ferguson is happy with Glazers' debt£1.5bn or you can say good Knight! Glazers to stand firm over United saleKeith Harris tempts Manchester United fans with golden share  Explore more:People:Lee Martin


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