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Hearts entering their darkest day, after going into administration

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Updated 18 Jun 2013 08:18:02

Hearts entering their darkest day, after going into administration

Hearts may have endured their 'darkest day' by applying to enter administration, but MP Ian Murray believes they can recover from their problems.

Murray is heading up the Foundation of Hearts Supporters who are looking to take over the cash-strapped club, who on Monday night confirmed they are to enter the process, having lodged papers at the Court of Session in Edinburgh. They are understood to have approached accountancy firm KPMG to act on their behalf.

"Today is the darkest day in the history of Heart of Midlothian Football Club, but in tragedy which has finally befallen the club, we must look to the future," Murray said.

"A club with a history as rich and proud as any in the world, now only us, the supporters can ensure Hearts has a future, and not just a future, but a future we can be proud of.

"The Foundation of Hearts is committed to a fan-led, community governed, transparent, and well-structured football club, at which supporters are at the very heart.

"We are backed by every one of the key supporters groups, by a significant group of former players, and by key players in the Edinburgh business community.

"There has been speculation upon speculation as to potential bidders for the club but that is all that it has been. The only real and credible buffers at this stage are the Foundation of Hearts and that is why we are asking every Hearts fan for their support."

Michael Stewart made over 100 appearances for the Jambos and is well acquainted with the club's problems.

"There's a certain level of inevitability that administration was coming sooner rather than later," he told Sky Sports News. "There's a lot of excess surrounding the club and a lot of staff may be lost. The club needs to clear the decks. It's well documented the club is saddled with a huge amount of debt."

The move follows a sustained period of financial tension at Tynecastle, with the club last week served with a winding-up order because of an unpaid £100,000 tax bill, although the majority of that sum has been paid. They were then hit with an immediate transfer embargo after admitting they could not afford to pay their players.


PA

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