skip to content

Reform on agenda for FIFA

25 May 2012 09:17:03

Reform on agenda for FIFA

FIFA's leaders will gather in Budapest on Friday to formally usher in the first reforms of a process that was sparked by a series of revelations of corruption and mismanagement last year.

The reforms, including more transparency and stricter rules on ethical behaviour, are not supported by all among FIFA's 209 member countries but are expected to be passed by FIFA's Congress in Budapest.

The more far-reaching reforms, including term limits and age limits for FIFA officials, will be presented to next year's FIFA Congress.

UEFA president Michel Platini said: "There are many inside that are perhaps not in favour but we have to do something for the good governance of FIFA, for the transparency of FIFA."

FIFA president Sepp Blatter, 76, is opposed to age limits.

He said: "I think there are a lot of veterans and I am happy to be a veteran. We don't like these age limits."

The Congress will also be asked to remove Chuck Blazer, the American who first blew the whistle on the bribery scandal a year ago, from FIFA's executive committee.

Delegates from the CONCACAF confederation of countries from north and central America and the Caribbean have asked FIFA to terminate Blazer's seat - after discovering that during his time as CONCACAF general secretary he did not file any tax returns for the organisation.

The Congress will also be asked to ratify the appointment of Lydia Nsekera, a member of Burundi's royal family, to be FIFA's executive committee's first female member.


PA

Sponsored links